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Animation 2.  By repeating the previous animation for one cycle of twenty-three poses, each placed in its correct location horizontally, we get this tidy display of the same information.



(This is the same animation that appeared at the start of this presentation.)

Modifications.  To reinforce its impact, this animation includes some modifications to Marey’s images. Successive figures fade gradually, becoming lighter and more transparent from right to left, to suggest time elapsed. Each figure’s left-hand side was added, in a very light shade, to suggest three dimensions. Omitting the figure’s feet reduces clutter without dropping too much information. A static grid supplies a scale of measure; it also anchors the viewer’s eye and balances the overall image. The result is an eye-pleasing, intuitively appealing way to look at human motion.

Three ways to look at time.  These three examples differ primarily in how they depict duration, or the passage of time. Marey’s original photo depicts duration statically, as distance along the horizontal axis. The previous animation depicts duration dynamically, as a sequence of poses at a fixed point, without regard to location. The animation above depicts duration in two ways at once: as a sequence of poses at fixed points, and as distance along the horizontal axis.

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